Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/38/d388173508/htdocs/appWordpress/wordpress/wp-content/themes/best-magazine/inc/front/frontend_params_output.php on line 527

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/38/d388173508/htdocs/appWordpress/wordpress/wp-content/themes/best-magazine/inc/front/frontend_params_output.php on line 527

Archive For The “Brown” Category

How The Ivy League Is Able To Break the NCAA’s Scholarship Limits and Still Consider Themselves FCS

By |

How The Ivy League Is Able To Break the NCAA’s Scholarship Limits and Still Consider Themselves FCS

By now you’ve seen the results.  In 2018, the Ivy League has taken the FCS by storm.

Perhaps it was Penn’s 30-10 defeat of Lehigh a couple of weeks ago.  Or maybe it was Princeton’s 50-9 drubbing of another team that made the FCS Playoffs last year, Monmouth.  Or maybe it was Yale’s shockingly dominant 35-14 win over nationally-ranked Maine last weekend.

The Ivy League has gone an astounding 12-4 so far in out-of-conference play, many of those wins coming against the Patriot League.

But it’s not just against the Patriot League where the Ivy League has excelled. 

Every Ivy League school has at least one out-of-conference victory, which is remarkable since it is only three games into their football season. 

The four losses – Rhode Island over Harvard, Holy Cross over Yale, Delaware over Cornell, and Cal Poly over Brown – were either close losses that could have gone either way or expected blowouts of teams picked to be at the bottom of the Ivy League.

Why the Ivy League, and why now?  How has the Ivy League turned things around, completely, as a league?

The answer appears to lie with three converging trends that every Ivy is starting to exploit to their advantage – increasing the overall number of athletic admits, using their so-called non-scholarship status to make a mockery of the scholarship limits of FCS football, and allowing essentially an unlimited roster size for home games.

Read more »

Read more »

How The Ivy League Is Able To Break the NCAA’s Scholarship Limits and Still Consider Themselves FCS

By |

How The Ivy League Is Able To Break the NCAA’s Scholarship Limits and Still Consider Themselves FCS

By now you’ve seen the results.  In 2018, the Ivy League has taken the FCS by storm.

Perhaps it was Penn’s 30-10 defeat of Lehigh a couple of weeks ago.  Or maybe it was Princeton’s 50-9 drubbing of another team that made the FCS Playoffs last year, Monmouth.  Or maybe it was Yale’s shockingly dominant 35-14 win over nationally-ranked Maine last weekend.

The Ivy League has gone an astounding 12-4 so far in out-of-conference play, many of those wins coming against the Patriot League.

But it’s not just against the Patriot League where the Ivy League has excelled. 

Every Ivy League school has at least one out-of-conference victory, which is remarkable since it is only three games into their football season. 

The four losses – Rhode Island over Harvard, Holy Cross over Yale, Delaware over Cornell, and Cal Poly over Brown – were either close losses that could have gone either way or expected blowouts of teams picked to be at the bottom of the Ivy League.

Why the Ivy League, and why now?  How has the Ivy League turned things around, completely, as a league?

The answer appears to lie with three converging trends that every Ivy is starting to exploit to their advantage – increasing the overall number of athletic admits, using their so-called non-scholarship status to make a mockery of the scholarship limits of FCS football, and allowing essentially an unlimited roster size for home games.

Read more »

Read more »

My FCS Top 25 Vote, Week 8, 10/26/2015

By |

My FCS Top 25 Vote, Week 8, 10/26/2015

If you’d like, you can check out my FCS Top 25 vote below.

The story of the week in James Madison after their loss to Richmond wasn’t the fact that College Football Gameday was there, nor was it about their big CAA conference loss, which took them out of the drivers’ seat for the CAA title and conference autobid.

It was the fact that their superstar quarterback, QB Vad Lee, sustained an injury that would require surgery and take him out for the remained of the season.

The play didn’t look like much.  The Dukes, who were already down by two touchdowns, saw Lee simply try to make something happen on a routine 2 yard run left.  A shoestring tackle by Richmond’s linebacker wasn’t particularly dirty, though in retrospect it looked like his foot was tackled awkwardly.

A play afterwards, Lee remained in, and collapsed after hucking a deep pass, and his incredible career at JMU was done.

Read more »

Read more »

Skip to toolbar